John Wolff's Web Museum

"Facit" Calculators


 

Contents

Facit C1-13
Facit Model C1-13, c.1971.

Overview.

Facit Badge The "Facit" company was established in Stockholm in 1918 to build a line of pin-wheel calculators based on the Odhner mechanism.

In 1924 Facit became part of Atvidaberg Industries, a long-established firm of office furniture and equipment suppliers. Facit production moved to Atvidaberg, and the model range developed rapidly. As the firm grew it absorbed the Halda typewriter company in 1938, Original-Odhner in 1942, and Addo in 1966. At its peak the company had over a thousand employees, with sales agents in a hundred countries, before collapsing in the early 1970s.

The early Facit calculators were similar to the Odhner, with rotary setting levers and a moving carriage which extended beyond the body of the machine. In the early 1930s engineer Karl Rudin made a radical design change which retained the pin-wheel principle but eliminated the external moving carriage. The pin-wheel mechanism was effectively turned upside-down, with the accumulator and counter registers being fixed in position at the top of the machine, and the rotor arranged to travel laterally within the confines of the body. At the same time, the rotary setting levers were replaced with the two-row "Dalton" keyboard mechanism. The operating levers and the cranking handle were the only external moving parts.

This "inverted" pin-wheel mechanism formed the basis of the Facit model range for the next 40 years. Beginning with the Model T in 9 x 8 x 13 format in 1932, the machine progressed through the Model TK (1936) and the NTK (1954) to the C1-13 of 1957, which continued with only minor changes into the early 1970s. The same mechanism formed the basis of the first motor-driven range, which progressed through several models into the fully-automatic CA1-13 of 1956. A 16-digit mechanism with back-transfer and a 10-key numeric keypad was introduced as the manual Model CM2-16 in 1959. The fully-automatic CA2-16 followed in 1962, with an updated Model 10-07 in 1967. The 13 and 16-digit mechanisms were both manufactured in parallel until the end of production in about 1973.

In 1966 Facit introduced the first of a range of electronic calculators manufactured by Sharp in Japan. The Facit machines had their own distinctive case designs, but the internals were generally similar or identical to the machines sold under Sharp's own brand. The electronic machines were sold in parallel with Facit's traditional mechanical calculators, but were initially much more expensive. The prices reached parity in about 1972, which effectively marked the end of mechanical calculator production.

Click on the photos below for larger illustrations.


Traditional pinwheel calculators.

Facit Standard Facit "Standard"
Digits: 9 keyboard, 10 counter, 15 accumulator
Dimensions: 170W x 170D x 140H, overall width 310mm
Weight: 6.8 kg
Manufactured: Sweden, 1924-1931

The "Standard" was the second machine to carry the Facit brand, and the first to be built under Atvidaberg Industries.

This is an early machine from the 1920s, on an original wooden base. The base has been shortened on the right-hand side at some stage in its 80-year history, and the cover has been lost. The mounting for the the lock can be seen towards the right-hand front, at what would once have been the centre.

The rotor has 9 places, with a quick-clearing lever at the left-hand side. The 10-digit counter register is fixed in the body of the machine above the setting levers, with a 15-digit accumulator mounted in the moving carriage. The tens-carry on the accumulator extends to 13 places, with an overflow bell mounted externally on the left-hand end of the carriage. The counter and accumulator are cleared with just half a turn of the large wing nuts.

The counter register on this machine uses complementary red and white figures. Later versions (1928-31) provided a full tens-carry mechanism.

The carriage can be moved one step in either direction by pressing the two keys at the left front of the machine, or it can be moved continuously by turning the large knob on the left-hand side. One of the ten keys along the front is pressed down to raise an internal stop, and the knob is turned to bring the carriage rapidly to the required position. The stop keys are numbered on the metal escutcheon plate, and the active position is clearly shown through a peep-hole above the centre of the carriage. The positioning mechanism operates through a lead-screw, so that the carriage remains firmly in place with no ratchets or detents.


Facit Model S Facit Model S, S/N 200631, 1935
Digits: 10 keyboard, 8 counter, 13 accumulator
Dimensions: 175W x 130D x 120H, overall width 350mm
Weight: 5.3 kg
Manufactured: Sweden, 1935-1954

Facit's traditional pinwheel design was replaced by the ten-key Model T in 1932. The demand for the earlier design obviously continued, as Facit found it necessary to reintroduce a conventional pinwheel model in 1935. In spite of the name on the rear panel, the Facit Model S is actually an Original-Odhner Model 7. Odhner apparently had a working relationship with Facit long before they were taken over in 1942.

The Odhner Model 7 is a basic pinwheel machine whose only "extra" feature is a push-button clearing mechanism for the rotor. There is no setting dial, no back-transfer, and no tens-carry on the counter. The Model 7 continued in production as the Facit Model S until 1954. The machine illustrated is an early example from 1935.



Manual ten-key calculators - with 2-row keyboard.

Facit TK (black) Facit Model TK, S/N 61905, 1941
Digits: 9 keyboard, 8 counter, 13 accumulator
Dimensions: 210W x 185D x 145H, overall width 300mm
Weight: 6.0 kg
Dalton keyboard, black sheet-metal covers
Manufactured: Sweden, 1936-1954

The first of the Facit "inverted" pinwheel calculators was the Model T from 1932. The Model TK from 1936 is essentially the same machine with a number of mechanical improvements. Although model numbers and exterior styling changed frequently, this basic ten-key mechanism continued in production with only minor changes for almost 40 years, from the mid-1930s into the 1970s.

The Facit TK illustrated was made in 1941, but has never been used. When purchased at auction in the 1970s it was still wrapped in its original rust-inhibiting paper and packaging, inside its carrying case. The high-gloss black paint is still in showroom condition, and the mechanism is still in full working order.

The Facit name and the manufacturers details are painted onto the front and back panels respectively. The word "Patent" is stamped into the back panel, with the serial number on the base.
Facit TK in carrying case.


Facit TK (grey) Facit Model TK, S/N 54254, 1937
Digits: 9 keyboard, 8 counter, 13 accumulator
Dimensions: 210W x 185D x 145H, overall width 300mm
Weight: 6.0 kg
Dalton keyboard, grey sheet-metal covers
Manufactured: Sweden, 1936-1954

Calculating machines were often repainted when returned to their dealers for major overhauls. This 1937 TK, originally in black as above, was "updated" to the new Facit grey colour scheme when overhauled sometime around 1960. The only identification remaining is the word "Patent" and the serial number stamped into the back panel.


Facit TK (green) Facit Model TK, S/N 179256, 1948
Digits: 9 keyboard, 8 counter, 13 accumulator
Dimensions: 210W x 185D x 145H, overall width 300mm
Weight: 6.0 kg
Dalton keyboard, green sheet-metal covers
Manufactured: Sweden, 1936-1954

This Model TK from the late 1940s has a slightly fancier green sheet-metal case with a pressed-metal "Facit" logo. The agent's transfer on the front is from "Sydney Pincombe Pty Ltd" of Sydney, Melbourne, and Hobart. The serial number is stamped underneath.


Facit NTK (green) Facit Model NTK, S/N 507834, 1957
Digits: 9 keyboard, 8 counter, 13 accumulator
Dimensions: 220W x 200D x 150H, overall width 300mm
Weight: 6.3 kg
Dalton keyboard, green die-cast cover
Manufactured: Atvidaberg-Facit, Sweden, 1954-1957

In the early 1950s Atvidaberg commissioned Sigvard Bernadotte, a distinguished silversmith and industrial designer (and a member of the Swedish royal family) to design new casings for the Facit machines and for the Original-Odhner 200-series.

The re-styled "New TK" was released as the Model NTK in 1954, with the sheet-metal covers being replaced with a three-piece die-cast casing in two-tone green. The cover has no visible screws, but is held in place by two spring clips concealed in the holes for the clearing levers. The octagonal keytops have been replaced by round for the numerals and rectagular for the shift controls. The maker's details and serial number are on a large aluminium plate on the base of the machine. The operation of the machine was unchanged, but there were a mumber of internal changes to refine the details of the mechanism and to simplify the construction.


Facit NTK (grey) Facit Model NTK, S/N 507837, 1957
Digits: 9 keyboard, 8 counter, 13 accumulator
Dimensions: 220W x 200D x 150H, overall width 300mm
Weight: 6.3 kg
Dalton keyboard, grey die-cast cover
Manufactured: Atvidaberg-Facit, Sweden, 1954-1957

Another 1957 version of the Facit NTK in a plain grey case. Note that the serial number is only 3 greater than the previous machine.


Facit C1-13 Facit Model C1-13, S/N 556608, 1957
Digits: 9 keyboard, 8 counter, 13 accumulator
Dimensions: 225W x 210D x 150H, overall width 310mm
Weight: 6.6kg
Dalton keyboard, green die-cast cover
Manufactured: Atvidaberg-Facit, Sweden, 1957-1972

New model numbers were allocated in 1957, with the TK-style machines becoming Model C1-13. The mechanism did not change significantly, but the case and clearing levers were re-styled, the numeral keys became square, and the Facit badge became round. This 1957 machine is still finished in the earlier two-tone green, with the Facit name spelled out across the back on a row of separate small round buttons. The metal-foil label above the registers was prepared by the local agents as a conversion table from pence to decimals of a pound. A more technical label was available for scientific and engineering applications.


Facit C1-13 Facit Model C1-13, S/N 851412, 1963
Digits: 9 keyboard, 8 counter, 13 accumulator
Dimensions: 225W x 210D x 150H, overall width 310mm
Weight: 6.6kg
Dalton keyboard, grey die-cast cover
Manufactured: Atvidaberg-Facit, Sweden, 1957-1972

The second version of the C1-13 has a two-tone grey colour scheme. The round metal name badge on the front of the machine has been replaced with a moulded plastic badge with rounded ends. The rear panel still has the Facit name spelled out on separate round buttons.


Facit C1-13 Facit Model C1-13, S/N 899682, 1966
Digits: 9 keyboard, 8 counter, 13 accumulator
Dimensions: 225W x 210D x 155H, overall width 310mm
Weight: 6.2 kg
Dalton keyboard, grey die-cast cover
Manufactured: Atvidaberg-Facit, Sweden, 1957-1972

This mid-1960s version of the C1-13 has a much more angular die-cast housing finished in a monotone medium-grey gloss. The front name badge is larger with rectangular ends, and there are larger square letters across the back.


Facit C1-13 Facit Model C1-13, S/N 946810, 1967
Digits: 9 keyboard, 8 counter, 13 accumulator
Dimensions: 225W x 210D x 155H, overall width 310mm
Weight: 6.2 kg
Dalton keyboard, grey die-cast cover
Manufactured: Facit AB, Sweden, 1957-1972

The nameplate of this 1967 machine reflects the change in company name from Atvidaberg-Facit to Facit AB in 1966. The colour scheme has changed to a very light grey, with a black base and keyplate and white shift keys. The mechanism is basically identical to the previous versions.


Facit C1-13 Facit Model C1-13, S/N 2405940, 1971
Digits: 9 keyboard, 8 counter, 13 accumulator
Dimensions: 230W x 210D x 160H, overall width 310mm
Weight: 5.8 kg
Dalton keyboard, die-cast base, grey plastic cover
Manufactured: Facit AB, Sweden, 1957-1972

This 1971 machine was the final version of the C1-13. The die-cast housing has been replaced by moulded plastic in a medium grey, with a pale yellow background around the registers. Production ended in Sweden in 1972, but the C1-13 was reportedly still made in India into the 1980s.



Manual ten-key calculators - with high-capacity carriage.

Facit LX Facit Model LX, S/N 103604, 1948
Digits: 10 keyboard, 10 counter, 19 accumulator
Dimensions: 220W x 210D x 160H, overall width 410mm
Weight: 7.8 kg
Dalton keyboard, green sheet-metal covers
Manufactured: Sweden, 1938-1954

The Facit Model LX from 1938 combined the inverted pinwheel mechanism with a moving carriage to provide a high-capacity machine with 10 places in the rotor, 10 in the counter, and 19 in the accumulator. The extended capacity provided the greater precision needed in many technical fields (eg surveying), but also simplified other complex calculations by allowing temporary storage of intermediate results at different locations along the 19-digit accumulator.

The appearance and internal mechanism of the LX are very similar to those of the Model TK (above), except that the registers are mounted in the moving carriage. The carriage fits neatly into the top of the machine, so that the register windows appear in the same positions as on the TK. The register clearing levers are mounted on the ends of the carriage rather than on the body of the machine. The winding handle has been lengthened to provide clearance when the carriage is in its right-most position. The setting keys move the rotor in the usual manner, but the left and right shift keys move the carriage one place at a time (up to 9 places). A lever at the left-hand end of the carriage allows rapid end-to-end movement.


Facit NLX Facit Model NLX, S/N 500108, 1954
Digits: 10 keyboard, 10 counter, 19 accumulator
Dimensions: 220W x 210D x 160H, overall width 410mm
Weight: 7.9 kg
Dalton keyboard, green sheet-metal covers
Manufactured: Sweden, 1954-56

The Model NLX replaced the LX in 1954. The only obvious external difference is in the rotor clearing handle, which now travels horizontally rather than vertically. Internally, however, the machine incorporated a host of changes to refine the details of the mechanism and to simplify the construction.


Facit C1-19 Facit Model C1-19, S/N 520498, 1956
Digits: 10 keyboard, 10 counter, 19 accumulator
Dimensions: 250W x 215D x 160H, overall width 450mm
Weight: 8.8 kg
Dalton keyboard, die-cast covers
Manufactured: Sweden, 1956-60

The Model C1-19 replaced the NLX in 1956. The mechanism was largely unchanged, but the sheet-metal covers were replaced with die-cast alloy mouldings similar to those of the new Model NTK (above). The winding handle and the register clearing handles are similar to those used on the Original-Odhner 200-series machines from the same period. This early C1-19 was originally used in the Brisbane offices of Mount Isa Mines. It was originally painted green, but has been "updated" twice during its working life with two different shades of grey.



Manual ten-key calculators - with 10-key keypad.

Facit CM2-16 Facit Model CM2-16, S/N 1081539, 1965
Digits: 11 keyboard, 9 counter, 16 accumulator
Dimensions: 240W x 275D x 155H, overall width 330mm
Weight: 7.8 kg
10-key keyboard, grey die-cast cover
Manufactured: Atvidaberg-Facit, Sweden, 1959-1967

Model CM2-16 from the 1960s was the first Facit calculator to use the now-familiar ten-key numeric keypad in place of the 2-row "Dalton" keyboard. The keypad mechanism achieves a very light touch by eliminating (almost) all spring tension on the downstroke, and using the rotor escapement and return spring to provide the restoring force for the upstroke.

The calculating mechanism is similar in principle to the Model TK, but is rather more elaborate. The rotor has been extended to 11 digits, with 9 in the counter register and 16 in the accumulator. The extra handle on the left-hand side controls a "back transfer" mechanism, which can operate between either the accumulator or the counter register and the rotor. (Most back-transfer mechanisms operate from the accumulator only, to allow re-use of the result from a multiplication. Back-transfer from the counter is a rare but valuable feature which provides the same convenience in division). The first three of the red control keys have the same functions as on the C1-13; the fourth (rightmost) is used to position the rotor for back-transfers. The machine has extensive interlocks to prevent mis-operation.

The CM2-16 is much heavier than the smaller 13-digit models, and is supported on rollers at the rear to allow it to be pushed back on the desk when not in use. The original owner of this machine has labelled it with the date of purchase: 18 May 1965.


Facit CM2-16S Facit Model CM2-16S, S/N 1099017, 1964
Digits: 11 keyboard, 9 counter, 16 accumulator
Dimensions: 240W x 275D x 155H, overall width 330mm
Weight: 7.5 kg
10-key keyboard, grey die-cast cover
Manufactured: Atvidaberg-Facit, Sweden, 1964

Model CM2-16S is a "Special" version of the CM2-16 which omits the back-transfer mechanism. The machine has a different keyplate and a revised pivot arrangement for the register clearing levers, but is otherwise identical to the standard model. The published lists of serial numbers suggest that only 30 units were ever built (199001 to 199030).
Facit CM2-16S nameplate


Facit CM2-13S Facit Model CM2-13S, S/N 1099580, 1964
Digits: 9 keyboard, 8 counter, 13 accumulator
Dimensions: 240W x 275D x 155H, overall width 330mm
Weight: 7.5 kg
10-key keyboard, grey die-cast cover
Manufactured: Atvidaberg-Facit, Sweden, 1964-65

Model CM2-13S is another "Special" version of the CM2-16 in the older 9 x 8 x 13 register configuration, and without the back-transfer mechanism. The unwanted components were simply left out during assembly.

Pinwheels 10 and 11 are still present and can be seen through the setting window at the left of the rotor, but they are not fitted with pins or setting rings. The accumulator carry drum still has all 16 places fitted, even though the register only has 13 places. The only components that are actually different in the 13S are the keyplate and register masks, the pivot post for the clearing levers, and a couple of spacers to limit the rotor travel.

The CM2-13S was functionally equivalent to the smaller and cheaper C1-13, and apparently was not a commercial success. Only a couple of hundred units were made during a brief period in the mid-1960s. The machine illustrated has a Sterling-currency conversion label above the register windows, indicating that it was sold prior to 1966.


Facit 10-04 Facit Model 10-04, S/N 1902508, 1967
Digits: 11 keyboard, 9 counter, 16 accumulator
Dimensions: 240W x 275D x 155H, overall width 330mm
Weight: 7.5 kg
10-key keyboard, light grey plastic cover
Manufactured: Facit AB, Sweden, 1967-1969

The Facit model range was reorganised again in 1967, with new model numbers in a 10-XX series. Model 10-04 is essentially the same as the well-established CM2-16, but with a plastic housing, a much lighter colour scheme, and a pull-out carry handle at the front.



Motor-driven calculators - with 2-row keyboard.

Facit NEA Facit Model NEA, S/N 286252, 1949
Digits: 9 keyboard, 8 counter, 13 accumulator
Dimensions: 265W x 250D x 165H
Weight: 10.2 kg
Dalton keyboard, grey pressed-metal cover
Manufactured: Sweden, 1943-1956

Facit's first electrically-driven calculators from the mid-1930s just used the motor to replace the winding handle. As additional automatic functions were added, the mechanical control systems became more and more complex, with operating levers sprouting from any available location.

This electric Model NEA from the 1940s is based on the 13-digit TK mechanism. The machine is deeper and wider than the TK, with the motor drive located at the rear and the mechanical control system at the right-hand end. The Model NEA performs fully automatic division and semi-automatic multiplication, but register clearing is still done manually by the handles on the left.

The machine illustrated was built in 1949, and was the main office calculator for a firm of surveyors in Melbourne during the 1950s. It continued in everyday use until replaced by a programmable electronic calculator in the early 1970s.


Facit Model NE Facit Model NE, S/N 428833, 1954
Digits: 9 keyboard, 8 counter, 13 accumulator
Dimensions: 265W x 250D x 165H
Weight: 9.6 kg
Dalton keyboard, green pressed-metal cover
Manufactured: Atvidaberg-Facit, Sweden, 1953-1956

The Model NE was produced for a short period in the mid-1950s as a simpler and cheaper alternative to the Model NEA. Its only automated feature is a mechanism which trips the main clutch when underflow occurs during division.


Facit Model ESA-0 Facit Model ESA-0, S/N 349720, 1953
Digits: 9 keyboard, 8 counter, 13 accumulator
Dimensions: 280W x 260D x 180H
Weight: 12.4 kg
Dalton keyboard, green pressed-metal cover
Manufactured: Atvidaberg-Facit, Sweden, 1949-1956

Facit's first fully-automatic calculator was the Model ESA (Electric Super-Automat) from 1945. The ESA extended the functions of the Model NEA (above) to include an automatic 8-digit multiplier, but it retained the manual clearing levers. Model ESA-0 from 1949 added a motorised clearing mechanism with three additional keys at the lower front. The keys and registers are numbered I, II, and III in left-to right order.


Facit Model CA1-13 - 1959 Facit Model CA1-13, S/N 677450, 1959
Digits: 9 keyboard, 8 counter, 13 accumulator
Dimensions: 280W x 280D x 190H
Weight: 12.6 kg
Dalton keyboard, light grey die-cast cover
Manufactured: Atvidaberg-Facit, Sweden, 1956-1973

Model ESA-0 was re-styled in 1956 to become Model CA1-13. The one-piece pressed-metal case was replaced with a two-part die-cast cover finished in a light two-tone grey. The Facit name is embossed into the upper section and appears on the small round badge below the counter register.


Facit Model CA1-13 - 1963 Facit Model CA1-13, S/N 1127360, 1963
Digits: 9 keyboard, 8 counter, 13 accumulator
Dimensions: 280W x 280D x 190H
Weight: 12.6 kg
Dalton keyboard, light grey/yellow die-cast cover
Manufactured: Atvidaberg-Facit, Sweden, 1956-1973

This CA1-13 from 1963 uses an AC capacitor-run motor instead of the earlier universal (brush-type) motor. The only external changes are to the colour scheme and the Facit badge on the top panel.


Facit Model CA1-13 - 1964 Facit Model CA1-13, S/N 1161579, 1964
Digits: 9 keyboard, 8 counter, 13 accumulator
Dimensions: 290W x 285D x 195H
Weight: 13.0 kg
Dalton keyboard, medium grey die-cast cover
Manufactured: Atvidaberg-Facit, Sweden, 1956-1973

A 1964 version of the CA1-13 in a more angular one-piece case, finished in a monotone grey gloss. This numbering of the registers has been reversed in this (and subsequent) versions - the setting register is now labelled I and the accumulator III.


Facit Model CA1-13 - 1970 Facit Model CA1-13, S/N 1262531, 1970
Digits: 9 keyboard, 8 counter, 13 accumulator
Dimensions: 290W x 285D x 195H
Weight: 12.7 kg
Dalton keyboard, light grey die-cast cover
Manufactured: Facit AB, Sweden, 1956-1973

A late-model CA1-13 in the light grey colour scheme. This model continued until the end of calculator production in 1973.



Motor-driven calculators - with 10-key keypad.

Facit CA2-16 Facit Model CA2-16, S/N 1514572, 1964
Digits: 11 keyboard, 9 counter, 16 accumulator
Memory: 8-digit internal memory register
Dimensions: 275W x 350D x 190H
Weight: 15.5 kg
10-key keyboard, grey die-cast cover
Manufactured: Sweden, 1962-1969
Original Owner: Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology

Facit Model CA2-16 from the 1960s is a fully-automatic machine with a 10-key numeric keypad and fully push-button operation. It is based on the 16-digit pin-wheel mechanism of the CM2-16 manual machine (above).

The keypad enters values directly into the 11-digit pinwheel rotor, and into an 8-place pinbox register which is used for multiplier or constant storage. The machine performs "short-cut" multiplication, and operates at 400 cycles per minute. The rotor travels the full width of the machine, so that it can engage with either the accumulator or the counter register. The rotor can receive back-transferred values from either register, allowing on-going calculations involving the results of a division, and it can transfer values between the registers, allowing the counter to be used as a memory or for the accumulation of products.

Fully-automatic mechanical calculators were complex and expensive machines, which were beyond the means of individuals and many businesses. This machine originally belonged to the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (now RMIT University), where it was used for teaching in the Department of Mathematics.


FacitCA2-16SX Facit Model CA2-16SX, S/N 1706651, 1966
Digits: 11 keyboard, 9 counter, 16 accumulator
Memory: 8-digit internal memory register
Dimensions: 275W x 350D x 190H
Weight: 15.4 kg
10-key keyboard, grey die-cast cover
Manufactured: Sweden, 1965-1967

The Model CA2-16SX is basically identical to the CA2-16 above, but without the accumulation and back-transfer functions on the counter register (Register II).


Facit 10-07 Facit Model 10-07, S/N 1571422, 1970
Digits: 11 keyboard, 9 counter, 16 accumulator
Memory: 8-digit internal memory register
Dimensions: 275W x 350D x 190H
Weight: 15.0 kg
10-key keyboard, grey plastic cover
Manufactured: Sweden, 1967-1972
Original Owner: Deakin University, Geelong

Model 10-07 from the late 1960s was the last of the Facit motor-driven calculators. It is functionally the same as the Model CA2-16 (above), but with some minor internal changes and a re-styled plastic casing instead of the alloy die-casting.

The "simplified" Model CA2-16SX was similarly re-styled to become Model 10-06.
Facit 10-07 keyboard detail (29kb)



Electronic calculators

In 1966 Facit introduced the first of a range of electronic calculators manufactured by Sharp in Japan. The Facit machines had their own distinctive case designs, but the internals were generally similar or identical to the machines sold under Sharp's own brand. The electronic machines were sold in parallel with Facit's traditional mechanical calculators, but were initially much more expensive. The prices reached parity in about 1972, which effectively marked the end of mechanical calculator production.


 

Facit 1124 external view Facit Model 1124, S/N 403253
Functions: ASMD, 1 memory
Technology: Bipolar DTL (Mitsubishi, 151 chips), shift register memory
Display: 14 digit, Nixie tubes
Dimensions: 275W x 325D x 120H, weight 5.16kg
Manufactured: Sharp, Japan, 1968

The Facit 1124 from 1968 is a substantial but very basic four-function desk calculator with a 14-digit display and one user-accessible memory. The internal circuitry is typical of the transition from discrete-transistor to first-generation (SSI) integrated circuit design.   More...


Facit 1135J External View (8kb) Facit Model 1135J, S/N 3500315
Functions: ASMD, K, square root, 3 memories
Technology: MOS-LSI (Rockwell, 7 chips)
Display: 16 digit, Nixie tubes
Dimensions: 300W x 330D x 105H, weight 4.24kg
Manufactured: Sharp, Japan, 1971

This Facit Model 1135J from 1971 is a (relatively) compact desktop machine with a 16-digit display and three accessible memories. The 150 SSI chips of the first-generation machines have been condensed into a set of just seven MOS-LSI chips from Rockwell in America.   More...


Facit 1111 external view Facit Model 1111, S/N 1112353
Functions: ASMD
Technology: MOS-LSI (4 chips), portable, NiCad batteries
Display: 8 digit, vacuum fluorescent tubes
Dimensions: 110W x 165D x 75H, weight 0.7kg
Manufactured: Sharp, Japan, 1970-71

This Facit Model 1111 is a re-packaged version of the famous Sharp EL-8. The Sharp machine was introduced in November 1970, and is generally accepted as the world's first battery-powered portable electronic calculator. The CPU chips in this machine have date codes from October 1970 to January 1971. The display board is dated 46.8.23 (23 August 1971) in the traditional Japanese format. A detailed description of the underlying Sharp EL-8 is available via the Sharp page.
Facit 1111 (Sharp EL-8) logic board (39kb).


Facit 1148 external view Facit Model 1148/0002, S/N 4823812
Functions: ASMD, K, percent, 1 memory
Technology: MOS-LSI (NEC, 2 chips)
Display: 15 column impact printer
Dimensions: 260W x 320D x 115H, weight 4.45kg
Manufactured: Sharp, Japan, late 1973

The Facit Model 1148 is a print-only desktop calculator in a casing similar to the Sharp CS-743R from early 1973, but with the same chipset and printer as the later Sharp CS-523.

When performing addition and subtraction the calculator operates in the same manner as the long-established mechanical adding and listing machines. Entries are printed in response to the add and subtract keys, and results are obtained with the separate total and sub-total keys. Multiplication and division operate algebraically. Entries or results can be added to (or subtracted from) the memory register, and retrieved with the memory total and sub-total functions. A switch setting allows currency amounts to be entered without using the decimal point key.
Internal view (29kb)



Facit accessories

Facit instruction manuals Facit Instruction Manuals

The Facit instruction manuals and operators' handbooks are very clear and well-written. They describe all the controls and functions of the machines, and give plenty of worked examples from a wide range of calculations. Reproductions of some of the Facit handbooks are listed on the Manuals page.


 

Facit men "Facit Man"

"Facit Man" appeared as a cartoon character (left) in many of the Facit instruction manuals from the 1950s and early 60s. He also existed as a hand-painted plastic figure (right) about 100mm high, which was sometimes used as a promotional gift for customers and prospects. The figure has magnets in its feet so that it can stand on top of the calculator while it is operating.


 

Resources for further information:


Original text and images Copyright © John Wolff 2002-15.
Last Updated: 1 July 2015

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